​​​Feminist Backlash to Political Islam: Evidence from Social Encounters in the Field

​​​Feminist Backlash to Political Islam: Evidence from Social Encounters in the Field

Abstract

​We conduct a field experiment that seeks to probe the mechanisms underpinning discrimination against immigrant minorities. Whereas existing research has investigated how in-group bias or economic interest affect discrimination against immigrants, less attention has been devoted to examining the role of gender. We hypothesize that negative stereotypes regarding gender norms among Muslims will make the perceived threat posed by immigration more salient among women rather than men in the host country. Our field intervention exposes unknowing bystanders from the host population to a brief social encounter with a confederate. We experimentally manipulate the religiosity of the confederate, her ethnic identity/immigrant status, and the nature of beliefs she espouses regarding the role of women in the household. We collect outcomes two ways: first, by observing whether bystanders provide help to the confederate in need of assistance, and second, by inviting bystanders to complete a putatively unrelated online survey that probes attitudes towards immigration. The fieldwork for this experiment is scheduled for Germany in the Summer of 2019.

Publication
Working Paper
Date